Life and Times of Guru Nanak Dev Ji

Guru Nanak Dev Ji

Guru Nanak Dev Ji (in Punjabi: ਗੁਰੂ ਨਾਨਕ) is said to have travelled far and wide across Asia teaching people the message of ik onkar (ੴ ) meaning one God, who dwells in every one of his creations and constitutes the eternal Truth. With this concept, he would set up a unique spiritual, social, and political platform based on equality, fraternal love, goodness, and virtue. Nanak's words are registered in the form of 974 poetic hymns, or shabda, in the holy text of Sikhism, the Guru Granth Sahib, with some of the major prayers being the Japji Sahib (jap 'to recite'; ji and sahib are suffixes signifying respect); the Asa di Var 'ballad of hope'; and the Sidh Gohst 'discussion with the Siddhas'.

Teachings of Guru Nanak Dev Ji




Namm Japo

In Sikhism, Nām Japō (Gurmukhi ਨਾਮ ਜਪੋ), Naam Japna, or Naam Simran refers to the meditation, vocal singing of hymns from the Sri Guru Granth Sahib or contemplating the various Names of God (or qualities of God), especially the chanting of the word Waheguru, which means "Wonderful Lord" representing the formless being, the creator of all the forms. Meditate on God's name.

Vand Chhako

Vaṇḍ Shhakō (Punjabi: ਵੰਡ ਛਕੋ) is one of the three main pillars of the teachings of Guru Nanak, the founder of the Sikhism. The other two pillars are Naam Japo and Kirat Karo. It means to share what you have and to consume it together as a community. The term is also used to mean to share ones wealth with others in the community, to give to charity, to distribute in Langar and to generally help others in the community who need help.

Kirat Karo

Kirat Karō is one of the Three pillars of Sikhism, the others being Naam Japo and Vaṇḍ chakkō. The term means to earn an honest, pure and dedicated living by exercising one's God-given skills, abilities, talents and hard labour for the benefit and improvement of the individual, their family and society at large. This means to work with determination and focus by the sweat of one's brow.




Hukumnama

A Hukamnama refers to a hymn from the Guru Granth Sahib which is given as an order to Sikhs or a historical order given by one of the Gurus of Sikhism. Nowadays, after the period of living gurus, The Hukumnama refers to a hymn from a randomly selected left hand side page from the Guru Granth Sahib on a daily basis in the morning.




Sakhis

Sakhi literally means "Historical Account" or Story. The term refers to the accounts of the historical events in Sikhism. It is a tale usually from the era during the times of the Gurus. However, many Sakhis do exist from the period before and after the times of the Ten Gurus. Most Sakhis have a moral lesson and highlight important Sikh principles.




Shabad

In Sikhism the term Shabad has two primary meanings. The first context of the term is to refer to a hymn or paragraph or sections of the Holy Text that appears in Guru Granth Sahib, the main holy scripture of the Sikhs. The Guru Granth Sahib is organised by chapters of ragas, with each chapter containing many shabads of that raga.